Missouri extends monoclonal antibody treatment site contracts

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Monoclonal antibody treatment has grown since July when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave emergency approval.

Gov. Mike Parson announced that Missouri’s six state-contracted monoclonal antibody treatment sites will be operational for an additional 30 days.

“Monoclonal antibody treatments have been successful for many COVID-19 patients and have allowed us to lessen the strain on Missouri’s health care systems,” Governor Parson said. “However, this treatment is not a replacement for the vaccine. Encouraging more Missourians to choose vaccination is still the most effective path for us to move past COVID-19.”

The initial monoclonal antibody treatment contract with SLSCO of Galveston, Texas, was activated by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) in late August to provide monoclonal antibody (mAb) infusion treatment for 30 days at sites in Butler, Jackson, Jefferson, Pettis, and Scott counties as well as the City of St. Louis. 

These sites began operating between August 25-31. 

The 30-day extensions will apply to each site's respective operating timeline. To date, 1,732 patients have been treated with monoclonal antibody infusions through these sites, and several other health care systems are also providing this care to their patients as needed.  

Authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for emergency use, monoclonal antibody treatments may help people who are at high risk for serious COVID-19 symptoms to recover faster and reduce the likelihood of staying in the hospital. High-risk individuals with a recent COVID-19 diagnosis are encouraged to contact their health care provider to discuss possible treatment options.

Missouri patients and health care providers can learn more about the available treatment sites in Missouri and how to access them using this map

Treatment is completely free for patients when accessing one of the six state-operated treatment centers. 

For more information see Monoclonal Antibodies for COVID-19: Tips and Frequently Asked Questions or visit combatcovid.hhs.gov.