A signature quilt started over 70 years ago was lost twice, finding its way into the hands of a granddaughter who repaired, assembled and quilted it; finishing the quilt this summer.

A signature quilt started over 70 years ago was lost twice, finding its way into the hands of a granddaughter who repaired, assembled and quilted it; finishing the quilt this summer.

Joan Bast, quilter and member of the Piece and Plenty Quilt Guild in Rolla, received signature blocks and a partial quilt top started over 70 years ago. Members and relatives of a Community Garden Club in rural Cuba and Leasburg meet four times a year to sit, sew and exchange recipes. They made quilt blocks and signature blocks, which were lost twice, and then found this spring by Charlene, a granddaughter of Elsie Kitchen.

Charlene contacted Bast and asked if she would care to repair, restore and complete the quilting of the blocks, and Bast agreed. Bast carefully completed the quilt, and during a special program at the Piece and Plenty Quilt Guild, Bast shared the story of the quilt with the members.

Bast said the women would visit and bring their quilt blocks to the home of the hostess. Each member was to bring two blocks. One block was to have their signature embroidered in the center of the block and the other block left open. Virginia Wallis, mother of Bill Wallis, who founded Wallis Companies, and several relatives of the Kitchen family had blocks that were in the quilt.

The quilt had signatures of Bast’s aunt, Oliva Mullen, her mother, Golden Mc Kee, her Grandmother, Elsie Mc Kee and a school teacher, Delia Heidenry. Heidenry was born Dec. 12, 1864 and died July 27, 1949, and with the fabric and date of Heidenry, and Bast’s relatives, Bast surmised the quilt and blocks were probably constructed around 1925 to 1949.

With help from guild member, Allison Holdawy, feed sack fabric was found to help restore some of the blocks. Some blocks were made from clothing scraps, with many seams to fill the block to the required pattern. Some of the background pieces were made from old table cloths, and Bast had to put additional quilting into some blocks to assure they would retain their shape. It was truly a quilt with an interesting history, Bast said.

Every quilt has a story and as always Bast has a lot of quilts and stories to share. Bast had restored it beautifully and the members of the guild enjoyed her quilt, as well as several other member’s vintage and heirloom quilts.

To see more interesting quilts, visit the guild's website at www.pieceandplenty.com. The guild also invites community members to attend their 2019 Ozark Festival of Quilts on Oct. 5 and Oct. 6. Members will present their quilts in Rolla Middle School at 1111 Soest Road.