Creating medical retainer agreements, enacting a Medical Practice Freedom Act and making sure health benefit plans continue to provide coverage for patients with eating disorders are among the bills already prefiled by a Rolla legislator.


Creating medical retainer agreements, enacting a Medical Practice Freedom Act and making sure health benefit plans continue to provide coverage for patients with eating disorders are among the bills already prefiled by a Rolla legislator.
Dr. Keith Frederick, who was re-elected last month to another two-year term in the Missouri House of Representatives, has prefiled five pieces of legislation before the 98th General Assembly begins its session in Jan. 7, 2015.
Frederick, an orthopedic surgeon, is the Republican representative for the 121st House District, which covers parts of Phelps County, including the city of Rolla and Pulaski County.
One of the bills Frederick has sponsored for next year is HB 261, which would allow for direct primary care to be provided through a medical retainer agreement between the physician and the patient.
Frederick compared this potential arrangement to that of a client who hires an attorney on retainer.
“All the direct primary care that you (the patient) require and that I (the physician) can provide through my office would be offered for a set monthly fee,” Frederick said of his proposal.
He filed a similar bill to this last year. Frederick said he patterned this measure after a piece of legislation in Michigan.
With this agreement, patients could pay, for instance, $60 to $70 a month, and have access to a family doctor with same-day or next-day appointments offered, according to Frederick.
Another bill prefiled by Frederick is HB 262, which would require health benefit plans to cover the diagnosis and treatment of eating disorders.
“This isn’t a new mandate,” Frederick said. “Insurance companies are not complying with the law.”
Frederick said some patients who have eating disorders get to a certain point in their treatment with their physician and then run out of benefits because their health insurance provider stops providing coverage.
He compared it to a health insurance carrier cutting off benefits in the middle of a surgery.
HB 265, which would enact the Medical Practice Freedom Act, would prohibit the approval of state licenses for physicians from being conditioned on participating in any public or private health insurance plan, public health care system, public service initiative or emergency room coverage.
“It should be based on their capabilities, education and skills, not on economic criteria,” Frederick said.
This measure would apply to physicians, chiropractors, optometrists and dentists in Missouri.
Another measure that Frederick prefiled is HB 264, the Fourth Amendment Protection Act that would prohibit Missouri and political subdivisions in the state from assisting a federal agency from collecting or using a person’s electronic data without the person’s informed consent or a warrant.
“This simply states that we don’t want Missouri to be facilitating with the overreach of the federal government by surveillance of you,” Frederick said.
He said this dovetails with Missouri Constitutional Amendment 9 relating to Missouri’s electronic data collection and privacy that voters overwhelming passed in the August election.
Frederick also prefiled HB 263, a measure that would add aviation activities to a list of recreational uses allowed for personal or private use and not for a commercial event or gathering.
Frederick said he still holds a private pilot’s license but is not actively involved in recreational activities.
The only other local legislator elected to the Missouri House who has prefiled a bill as of Wednesday was freshman lawmaker Jason Chipman, who was elected to his first term in November for the 120th District, which takes in eastern Phelps County, including the city of St. James, and almost all of Crawford County.
Chipman prefiled one bill, HB 179, regarding the veteran designation on a Missouri driver’s license.
Currently, a military veteran may receive a veteran designation on his or her driver’s license only if a U.S. Department of Defense discharge document, otherwise known as a DD Form 214, is presented that shows a discharge status of "honorable" or "general under honorable conditions" that establishes the person's service in the U.S. armed forces.
A description of Chipman’s proposal states the measure would allow a person to present a DD Form 214 or a U.S. Uniformed Services Identification Card, otherwise known as a DD Form 2, that includes a discharge status of "retired" or "reserve retired" to establish the person's service in the U.S. armed forces.