The idea of starting your own business is part of the classic American dream, but for two local residents, part of that dream is using their business to support the community.

The idea of starting your own business is part of the classic American dream, but for two local residents, part of that dream is using their business to support the community.

David Schott and Mike Snyder share a passion for not only good food, but doing their part to see the local community grow. Last March, the two of them got to work developing their own food truck business, and have been networking with local vendors to encourage a feeling of community for those shopping downtown.


“We’ve been to a lot of other towns and places where we’ve seen this kind of thing, whether it’s the food truck or even a coffee business,” explained Schott. “We’re both into coffee…and we thought we could probably do this.” After some research into how to construct their food truck, The Bus Stop was created, focusing on specialty coffee drinks with a select food menu. Schott explained they began by setting up at the downtown farmer’s market on Saturdays, welcoming the community to not only try their products, but all of the products presented by small local businesses.

Orienting their business around the community was a priority from the beginning, according to Schott. The base of their food truck is actually an old school bus purchased from a St. James vendor last March.

The majority of the materials that went into renovating the bus had local origins as well, down to the cedar wood around their four sinks, which came out of Vichy, according to Schott. The only item not from the area is their espresso machine, which still uses locally roasted coffee, Sacred Seed, in all of their drinks.


“Working with local people can make a big difference,” said Snyder, a statement that serves as a basis for their entire business.

Schott added that “part off what makes a place attractive to people is what happens in that place.” He and Snyder saw all of the events that take place in Rolla, and viewed The Bus Stop as a way to not only take advantage of them, but as an asset to help those events draw larger crowds.

“Besides a business idea just for us, we realized we could bring something to the community that could help the community take an elevated step up,” Schott said. “We really like the farmer’s market. We’re both into supporting farmers and we’re both into supporting our local community. The farmer’s market, because of that, was a place we rally wanted to tap into.”


Snyder added that they’ve “made the market [their] home base,” and explained they use many of the market’s goods in their recipes. When Snyder isn’t using eggs from his own chicken’s to whip up a quiche in their portable kitchen, he’s using eggs straight from the market.

The two businessmen choose to keep a small, select menu to compliment their coffee drinks, which allows them to focus on quality, and narrowing down their ingredient lists helps to draw as much from the local market as possible.

“The market in Rolla is growing fast,” Snyder said. “This past year we had almost fifty vendors at the height of it in the middle of summer—it can only grow.” He added that based on feedback from market vendors, they feel their presence has helped to draw a crowd. While serving their own products, they also encourage others to do as much shopping as they can at the downtown farmer’s market.


“We think that if everyone works together, we can make the market a really cool thing—a destination,” said Dave.