At the Friday night basketball game against Macks Creek, Newburg faculty members received a check for $2,400 to supplement their projects as part the 2018 enrichment grant. This is the second year the Newburg School District has received the grant from Phelps County Bank (PCB).

At the Friday night basketball game against Macks Creek, Newburg faculty members received a check for $2,400 to supplement their projects as part the 2018 enrichment grant. This is the second year the Newburg School District has received the grant from Phelps County Bank (PCB).


The check was presented on behalf of Phelps County Bank by Tish Tsiptsis, Shannon Birdsong and Jaimie Brurnett.


Chris Jessen, music teacher, received partial funding for a choir trip to the Fox Theater in St. Louis, according to Superintendent Dr. Lynne Reed. A similar trip was made last year.


Third grade teachers Crystal Light and Dianne Martin, received a grant to create an in-classroom escape room adventure for their students. They will be purchasing a kit to set up an escape room, a series of puzzles students will solve by obtaining clues relating to learning. The puzzles connect to each other, and Dr. Reed said the project promotes crucial thinking and teamwork skills.


Christy Campbell, 5th and 6th-grade science teacher, received partial funding for a 6th-grade field trip to the Wonders of Wildlife Museum and Aquarium in Springfield.

The enrichment grant helps Newburg faculty provide activities to engage and educate students outside of the typical classroom curriculum.

Last year, the grant was responsible for several different programs such as the Mindful Moments lessons, where fifth, sixth and first-grade students were taught basic meditation and breathing exercises. The grant also allowed Art teacher Amanda Peery to bring out her students’ inner Pollock in a messy, outdoors learning experience featuring a large amount of splattered paint.


According to Dr. Reed, only two teachers applied to use the grant money last year to create their own enrichment activities for their classrooms. This year however, following the success of the 2017 grant, Dr. Reed said more teachers became interested after seeing the possibilities of what an enrichment activity could look like.

The faculty submitted applications with descriptions of how they would like to use the grant. These applications were then scored on several categories before the final projects were approved to be able to use the grant money.

The scoring criteria consisted of a description of the activity, the expected impact on the students, how it connects to other areas of learning, the overall value of the activity and it’s budget feasibility.

Dr. Reed said the goal of the activities funded by the grant is to engage students and to integrate learning from multiple fields at the same time.


For example, when students took a trip to the Fox Theatre last year, they did more than simply see a show. During lunch on The Hill, one of St. Louis’ many historic neighborhoods, the students also learned about the local architecture, and visited the theatre’s small museum to learn about it’s local history.


“You’re creating not only memories, but experiences they will take with them into their adult life,” said Dr. Reed. The faculty’s goal is to provide more than just field trips and fun activities. The projects funded by the enrichment grant provide ways to educate children outside of classroom curriculum, and enables teachers to pull from different areas to create unique ways to help their students grow.