You never know when a fire is going to break out—you just hope it is not on a hot day. Yesterday, Rolla Rural Fire Protection District (RRFPD) was not so lucky. They responded to a house fire yesterday afternoon, with the call coming in at 2:54 p.m., when the temperature was in the mid-90’s.

You never know when a fire is going to break out—you just hope it is not on a hot day. Yesterday, Rolla Rural Fire Protection District (RRFPD) was not so lucky. They responded to a house fire yesterday afternoon, with the call coming in at 2:54 p.m., when the temperature was in the mid-90’s. A pumper truck dispatched to 11820 Dillon Outer Road. RRFPD Fire Chief Roger Hayes said the call was for “automatic mutual aid,” meaning the St. James Fire Department was called as well.
Two firefighters were at the station when the call came in and by the time everyone was on the scene, it was 3:11 p.m.
“We were told the house was 75 percent involved and everybody was out of the house,” said the Chief.  
The one story rented home was engulfed in flames, with heavy smoke, when the firefighters arrived.
“St. James set up a pumper truck on the west end and we set up our pumper on the west end and attacked [the fire] from multiple directions,” explained Chief Hayes. “As involved as it was, it took a couple hours to get control of the scene.
Chief Hayes said the afternoon heat played a big part in wearing down the firefighters.
“There were no injuries, but a few of the firefighters had to take breaks and cool off, from being overwhelmed by heat,” he noted.
Thus far, a cause of the fire has yet to be determined.
“We put in a call to an investigator with the Missouri State Fire Marshal’s office,” he said. “So this fire is under investigation. The house is still standing, but it does have extensive fire damage throughout.”
Chief Hayes said the American Red Cross was called to come in and aid the family.
“I’m proud of our firefighters as well as the St. James firefighters—especially for the type of fire it was in the heat of the day,” said Chief Hayes. “Also, Phelps County Ambulance was there to keep an eye on our guys and to help them cool down.”