Liz Sperry is running for the Phelps County Recorder of Deeds office, as a Democrat, in the upcoming November election. Many people unfamiliar with county government positions and the work they do might be surprised by the importance of the job, according to Liz.

(Editor’s note: RDN inadvertently left out Liz Sperry, who is running for the recorder of deeds position in our coverage of the Democratic Stump Picnic. This is an effort to correct the omission and we wish all of the candidates well in the upcoming November election.)

Liz Sperry is running for the Phelps County Recorder of Deeds office, as a Democrat, in the upcoming November election. Many people unfamiliar with county government positions and the work they do might be surprised by the importance of the job, according to Liz.

“The recorder of deeds is responsible for safeguarding the property interests of its citizens,” she said. “Everyone in Phelps County that owns property that has a mortgage or a deed is responsible for ensuring that it’s filed properly, accurately and on time to help prevent property fraud. This is a bigger issue than many people know.”

Liz said here in Phelps County, the recorder of deeds is also responsible for the issuance of marriage licenses and keeping a record of the DD-214’s for anyone who releases from the military and considers Phelps County their home of record.
“It’s a multi-faceted job, but the number one priority job is to safeguard property and trusts,” she clarified.

Liz added she also likes paperwork, which is probably a good attribute to have for this job, and that implies an affinity for soft  skills such as organization and a particular focus on the details. She says it is simply having a vision.

“I see in my mind how I need things to work out and I make it happen,” she explained. “I do love to get other people’s input on things and if someone else has an idea that will work—even better.”
She said the end result is most important.

She has been a resident in Rolla for about 10 years, moving here from Colorado Springs. She is originally from Connecticut, later Vermont, and wound up in the military. She is married to Rolla business owner Karl Kindel and they have three children.

“I’ve been fortunate to be involved in so many things [here in Rolla],” Liz said.
She immediately got involved in the Rolla Downtown Business Association.
“I got to see how active everyone is—they’re so invested in the community,” Liz added.
She has also been involved with Mothers of Pre-Schoolers at Greentree Christian Church and became a “mentor mom” in that program. She still volunteers at the schools in town. She will soon be helping to put together a home and school partnership at the junior high school, which is like a parent-teacher organization, only less formal.

She said she likes bringing an element of creativity to her work and she laughs about her recent art classes stimulating her right-brain activity. But it was an advocacy project that opened her eyes to running for a public office.

“A couple of years ago, I had a unique opportunity to work on the “They’re Worth It” campaign with the school board,” she said.
This was an effort to get pre-K kids into the elementary schools and involved getting a tax-levy and bond issue passed.

“There were so many people from so many backgrounds involved in getting this done; and regardless of political affiliation, everyone worked together because it was for the betterment of our community,” she explained. She was hooked.

Running as a Democrat for the recorder of deeds position is a mixed-emotion issue for Liz; not because she isn’t on board with Democrat values, but because she just doesn’t feel it’s necessary for a position like this to be tied to one party or the other. She has ideas for the office and said they aren’t partisan-based—only community-based. Still, she feels it important to be politically active in the community.

“I sought out the Democratic committee and now I’m the representative of my ward,” she noted. “The key to really finding your foothold in a community is putting the community’s interests above your own and deciding which ones you want to help make better.”