Four days and six hours before the polls close in Tuesday’s primary election, a Republican gubernatorial candidate told a local crowd of about 45 why she should be the GOP nominee for Missouri’s next governor.

Four days and six hours before the polls close in Tuesday’s primary election, a Republican gubernatorial candidate told a local crowd of about 45 why she should be the GOP nominee for Missouri’s next governor.
Catherine Hanaway, one of four people running on the Republican ticket for governor in the Aug. 2 primary, visited the Eugene E. Northern Community Hall during a campaing stop.
Hanaway is a former U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Missouri and was the first female Speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives.
“I’m running for governor because I think we have to do two things in this state. We’ve got to make our streets safe again and we have to bring quality jobs,” said Hanaway, who is running against Peter Kinder, Eric Greitens and John Brunner in the Republican primary.
Four Democrats are also running in the primary — Chris Koster, Eric Morrison, Leonard Joseph Steinman II and Charles B. Wheeler.
Regarding safer streets, Hanaway said, “The events in Ferguson have led to disregard, disrespect, targeting and murder of police officers around the country.”
A Leasburg police officer in the crowd said later in the event that it should be evident in Missouri’s next governor that he or she supports law enforcement officers and that it be done quickly if or when police officers are assaulted.
Hanaway also shared her stances on abortion, the 2nd Amendment and her plan to bring back jobs.
“To me, the most fundamental right, and I think it’s a constitutional right and I know it’s a God-given right, is the right to life…If I get to be your next governor, we’re going to end funding for Planned Parenthood,” Hanaway said.
She said she supports constitutional carry. “Gov. Nixon vetoed it this year. If I had been governor, I would’ve signed it. I will always stand up for your 2nd Amendment rights as governor.”
Regarding jobs, Hanaway said, “We can do better. And the road map is there in other states. It’s right-to-work, lower taxes, beating back trial lawyers and their frivolous lawsuits, its limiting regulations…” as well as supporting vocational technical education.
About business regulations, Hanaway said, “While it may sound weird to say in a college town, we need to stop asking every kid to go to college,” noting that a majority of Missourians do not have a four-year college degree.
Regarding regulations, she noted that the barber regulations in Missouri are 50,000 words long, but the book of Revelation in the Bible is a fifth of that.
She also supports expansion of agribusiness in the state.
Hanaway then took some time to answer questions from the audience, noting that she is against Obamacare and said she will not support expanding Medicaid in Missouri.
In response to a question about improving cellphone service in rural areas in Missouri, Hanaway admitted that she had no answer.
Regarding education funding, Hanaway said that the GOP-led Legislature has provided more funding to education now than in past years, but that Nixon keeps withholding it.
“I’ll never withhold appropriated money from schools,” Hanaway said, noting that she would look at other areas of the budget to withhold if she had to.
Before Hanaway’s talk, Bob May, with the Phelps County Republican Central Committee, spoke about working with Hanaway when they both were legislators in the Missouri House of Representatives.
“She’s a strong candidate for governor…she’s a leader,” May said, adding that while he hasn’t always agreed with her, “she will listen and work with all of us.”