In recognition of National Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 6-12, the public is invited to attend an open house hosted by the Rolla Rural Fire Protection District, this Saturday, Oct. 5, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 1575 E. Lions Club Drive.

In recognition of National Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 6-12, the public is invited to attend an open house hosted by the Rolla Rural Fire Protection District, this Saturday, Oct. 5, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 1575 E. Lions Club Drive.
Phelps County Ambulance Service, Air-Evac Lifeteam and LifeLine helicopters will also participate.
A bounce house for children will be available and a mock extrication will be performed. Soda and hot dogs will be served.
A similar open house will be held at the City of Rolla Fire and Rescue headquarters at 1490 E. 10th St. from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the following Saturday, Oct. 12.
According to Rolla Fire Chief Robert Williams, the event will showcase the department's hazardous material decontamination lines. The department will have set up their decontamination shower and will use Rescue Randy, the department's 175 pound life-like dummy, to demonstrate the steps needed in dealing with a hazardous material accident.
The parking lot will be filled with vehicle and apparatus displays and demonstrations. There will be free plastic fire helmets and badges for kids. As well, the public will be able to check out the department's thermal imaging cameras.
"We are going to put a firefighter in a dark room and then let individuals come in and try to find him," said Williams.
He added that the department will also visit all of the Rolla elementary schools and area day cares throughout this month giving educational programs.
The 2013 Fire Prevention Week theme is Prevent Kitchen Fires.
State Fire Marshal Randy Cole is urging Missourians to learn about and take simple steps to prevent kitchen fires this year. More fires occur in the kitchen than in any other room of the house.
Cooking is the leading cause of home fires and of home fire-related injuries.
"Kitchen fires, especially those involving grease, can spread quickly and be very difficult to put out," Cole said. "There are other fire risks in the kitchen, too, including toasters, toaster ovens and overloaded outlets and extension cords. That is why it is essential to know how fires can start in the kitchen, understand the ways they can be prevented and have an action plan for what to do if a fire starts."
Cole also suggests creating a family fire safety plan that includes learning about kitchen fire hazards and how to avoid them, as well as developing a home fire escape plan.
Families should regularly practice these plans and explain them to children, revising the plan as the children grow up.
Cole adds that having a working smoke detector is essential to ensuring your family is alerted in case of a fire and suggests replacing smoke detector batteries at least once a year to help ensure they will work when needed.
The end of Daylight Saving Time, 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013, when clocks are adjusted to "fall back" an hour can serve as an easy reminder to change batteries.
Fire Prevention Week is recognized annually by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and fire departments and safety agencies across the country.
In 2011, there were 370,000 home structure fires resulting in 2,520 deaths across the nation.
For more than 85 years, fire departments have observed Fire Prevention Week, making it the longest running public health and safety observance on record.
For more information on Fire Prevention Week, visit www.firepreventionweek.org.