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The Rolla Daily News - Rolla, MO
  • Sen. Dan Brown Column: Celebrating a Special Birthday

  • June 14 is a very historic date in American history. In 1775, the Second Continental Congress decided to officially label the scruffy group of boys and men who had been taking aim at the British troops in order to better organize and strengthen the forces needed to defeat the powerful army of the queen.
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  • June 14 is a very historic date in American history. In 1775, the Second Continental Congress decided to officially label the scruffy group of boys and men who had been taking aim at the British troops in order to better organize and strengthen the forces needed to defeat the powerful army of the queen.
    The fighting between the British troops and the American patriots became much more intense, and the newly formed group of various militia and minutemen needed a commander, someone who could effectively lead them into victory to sever the ties with their British homeland and declare their independence.
     
    John Adams addressed the Congress that year with the recommendation of George Washington as Commander-In-Chief of the newly adopted army. It was on that day, June 14, 1775, that the Continental Army was born.
    Washington had an enormous task ahead of him, when he assumed command of the troops in July of that same year. Legend has it that Washington sought a symbol, or banner, that would unify the troops and identify the strength of the burgeoning nation.
    This would bring the story of Betsy Ross into the limelight. There are several variations of the tale, but the most prevalent details when Washington went to Ross with a design drawn up by members of the Continental Congress and Ross suggested the five-point stars in a circular arrangement to compliment the 13 stripes of alternating red and white.
    The Congress from that year drew up a resolution that was passed on June 14, 1777, stating that “the flag of the United States be 13 stripes, alternate red and white; that the Union be 13 stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.”
    So, this week, we celebrate both the unification of our nation’s symbol, the American flag, and the birth of our country’s Armed Forces, from which emerged the most powerful nation in the world.
    So, on this Flag Day, armed with a little history, may you proudly display your patriotic pride and wave Old Glory for all to see.
    Although the legislative session has ended for the year, I pledge to continue working for my district. My office will be open, and ready to address your concerns and issues. Always feel free to contact me throughout the year with any comments, questions, or issues by calling my office at (573) 751-5713 or by visiting my website at www.senate.mo.gov/brown.
    Thank you for reading this and for your participation in state government.
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