Owing to my work schedule, I watch very little television. What little I watch is always recorded for viewing later. The digital video recorder is a blessing, for I never have to watch commercials.

Owing to my work schedule, I watch very little television. What little I watch is always recorded for viewing later. The digital video recorder is a blessing, for I never have to watch commercials.

It’s especially a blessing during the political campaign. I’ve watched a few political campaign commercials, but most of the time I just zip through them, thanks to the DVR.

I’ve been to several political events, and I enjoyed them, mostly. They were a little taxing at times, but I understand the value of them and I appreciate the willingness of the candidates to get out amongst us folks. Last Saturday, I missed the Tea Party Rally. I meant to go for part of it, but by the time I got there, it was over. The organizers had told us that it would be from noon to 5 p.m., and that is what we put in the Community Calendar. I thought I had plenty of time to get there.

My wife and my daughter had scheduled a little birthday party for one of our grandsons and one of our poodles. Yes, we have a party for the poodles. My wife also dressed them up for Halloween; kids out trick-or-treating loved them. Anyway, we had a combined celebration for Joe Mike, the boy, and Henry, the poodle, at 1 p.m. We enjoyed the family time, and eventually I got to the Lions Club Park just a few minutes after 3 p.m. The first thing I noticed when I drove into the park was the lack of cars. “Whatintheworld,” I said. “This rally was supposed to last until 5.”

As I drove up to the pavilions, I saw people taking down signs and packing up their cars.

It was all over. I was sort of disappointed, yet sort of glad, too. I got out, talked to some people, snapped a picture of Yusha Sager and then talked politics with another old boy for a while and then left.

The day was cool and windy, so folks weren’t inclined to talk at length.

I found out later that Jerry Rosa’s String Works Jam Band played for 30 minutes. (That’s what I was sorry I missed more than the political talk.)

Here is the lineup of speakers:

• Rep. Shane Scholler (R-139) candidate for secretary of state;

• Sen. Dr. Dan Brown (R-16);

• Associate Circuit Judge Bill Hickle (R), candidate for 25th Circuit judge, Division 1;

• Former Rep. Cynthia Davis, O’Fallon (CP), candidate for lieutenant governor;

• U.S. Rep Todd Akin (R-MO2), candidate for U.S. Senate;

• Rep. Jason Smith (R-12), unopposed in his district race;

• Tom Hurst (R), 62nd Legislative candidate;

• Rolla 3rd Ward City Councilman Gary Hicks (R), candidate for Phelps County Commission, District 1;

• Jonathan Dine (L), candidate for U.S. Senate;

• Dr. Cisse Spraggins (L), secretary of state candidate candidate; and

• Sean O'Toole (L), state treasurer candidate.

The crowd ranged from 150 to nearly 200 at times during the afternoon.

The five-hour block of time was selected to give the speakers plenty of time and to have plenty of time for open-microphone speakers. Only eight people spoke at the open mike, I heard later.

For more information, you can log onto www.rollateaparty.webs.com site.

Looking back on the afternoon. I appreciate the Tea Party’s work to have candidates meet the public, and I wish I hadn’t missed the whole thing, but I’m also glad I was in a warm house with my family, including my poodles, instead of out at the windy park.