|
|
The Rolla Daily News - Rolla, MO
  • Walk to Defeat ALS is Saturday

  • The Rolla Walk to Defeat ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease will be Saturday, Sept. 29, registration starts at 9 a.m. and the walk begins at 10 a.m. at Rolla Lions Club Park located off Highway 63 South in Rolla.
    • email print
  • What: Rolla Walk to Defeat ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease)
    When: Saturday, Sept. 29, registration starts at 9 a.m. and the walk begins at 10 a.m.
    Where: Rolla Lions Club Park located off Highway 63 South in Rolla
    Why you should attend:
    There will be a walk, raffles with donations by area businesses, refreshments and music. “It's something to enjoy and for people to get together, including people who have ALS,” said Brenda Jackson, who is walking on a team for her husband, Troy, who passed away from ALS six months after he was diagnosed. Last year's ALS walk in Rolla raised $6,475. All proceeds benefit the St. Louis Regional Chapter of the ALS Association. “We need to make people aware,” Jackson said.
    About ALS:
    • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord.
    • Approximately 5,600 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with ALS each year, and it is estimated that as many as 30,000 Americans may have the disease at any given time.
    • ALS was first described in 1869 by French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot, but it wasn't until 1939 that baseball player Lou Gehrig brought attention to the disease when he was diagnosed with the condition and later died from ALS.
    • Most commonly, the disease strikes people between the ages of 40 and 70.
    • Although the life expectancy of an ALS patient averages about two to five years from the time of diagnosis, this disease is variable and many people live with quality for five years and more. More than half of all patients live more than three years after diagnosis.
    • While there is not a cure or treatment today that halts or reverses ALS, there is one FDA-approved drug, riluzole, that modestly slows the progression of ALS as well as several other drugs in clinical trials that hold promise.
    For more information: visit www.walktodefeatALS.org
      • calendar