Doolittle resident Douglas Braidlow, 49, turned himself in to federal agents last week after a St. Louis federal court decided there was probable cause to believe he had committed another drug-trafficking crime and violated conditions of his bond, according to an order filed with the court on Tuesday.


Doolittle resident Douglas Braidlow, 49, turned himself in to federal agents last week after a St. Louis federal court decided there was probable cause to believe he had committed another drug-trafficking crime and violated conditions of his bond, according to an order filed with the court on Tuesday.


Braidlow, arrested by federal agents in January and charged by indictment with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute in excess of 500 grams of methamphetamine, was released from federal custody Jan. 12 on a $10,000 bond, fully secured by cash.


Braidlow’s arrest occurred subsequent to the Oklahoma arrest of two other men who alleged they were delivering 8.6 pounds of crystal methamphetamine to Braidlow in Doolittle. The drug was hidden in the spare tire of their rented car.


According to a Bond Revocation and Detention Order issued by a U.S. magistrate judge, Braidlow appeared at the U.S. District Court in St. Louis at a hearing on March 18 in which his bond was revoked because, according to the testimony of a special federal agent, in his opinion, Braidlow’s “. . . risks of non-appearance and danger to the community have increased significantly.”


Additionally, the court set his trial for April 22 in the U.S. District Court in St. Louis with District Court Judge Richard Webber. If found guilty, Braidlow could be sentenced to prison for 10 years to life, and/or be fined up to $4 million.


The federal special agent told the court he sent a “confidential informant,” who had known Braidlow for many years, to Braidlow’s home on March 12 to purchase methamphetamine. The informant, wired with a tape recorder, allegedly purchased 3.5 grams (an “8-ball”) of methamphetamine for $200 from Braidlow.


The methamphetamine tested positive in a field test; a search warrant was issued, but the “buy money” and methamphetamine were not found in Braidlow’s home at 11 p.m. the same day.


“However, several torn baggies were found in the kitchen garbage can,” the court order stated.

“The way the baggies were torn indicated to (the special agent) that they had been used for drug packaging.”


Additionally, federal agents also located a triple-beam scale and several other cans that “smelled strongly of marijuana.” Moreover, a convicted felon was present at Braidlow’s house at the execution of the search warrant, in violation of the terms of his release.


In addition to finding probable cause that Braidlow “committed a federal, state or local crime while on pretrial release,” the court also ordered Braidlow be confined to a corrections facility, “. . . separate to the extent practicable from persons awaiting or serving sentences or being held in custody pending appeal.”