Rolla Municipal Utilities gave a partial response to the accusations made at the last City Council meeting.

Robert and Carolyn Weitzsacker had come to lodge a number of complaints against RMU.

One of which was the appearance of surveyors on their property.

“They did some things that we don’t think were done in an appropriate manner,” Robert Weitzsacker said previously.


Rolla Municipal Utilities gave a partial response to the accusations made at the last City Council meeting.
Robert and Carolyn Weitzsacker had come to lodge a number of complaints against RMU.
One of which was the appearance of surveyors on their property.
“They did some things that we don’t think were done in an appropriate manner,” Robert Weitzsacker said previously.
During his presentation, Weitzsacker claimed a crew had come and surveyed his land.
RMU board members faced questions about the incident from Tom Sager, a former Missouri S&T professor, at the RMU board meeting Monday.
“At the last City Council meeting there was a gentleman who said RMU had sent a surveyor onto his land without prior notification. I was just wondering if this was standard operating procedure?” Sager asked.
Board member John Wiggins responded that normally it would not be the procedure of RMU.
“What you are not aware of is that there has been communication with Ameren UE about their right of ways,” Dr. James Stoffer, the president of Board of Public Works said.
The company hired by RMU, MECO Engineering sent a letter to the Weitzsackers on Dec. 15 to explain what its role had been.
Ameren UE owns a substation  along County Road 2170 that RMU wants to purchase.
According to a letter that was sent by Norman Ellerbrock, the vice president of MECO Engineering, the surveyors had been there to survey the Ameren land and may have needed to mark the Weitzsacker property corners.
Weitzsacker disputes that assertion. He said Wednesday that the surveyors had shown him a work order that included parts of his land. He did not have copies of the work orders.
At the council meeting, Weitzsacker accused the surveyors of even putting a stake through his driveway.
“That is not correct,” Stoffer exclaimed at the accusation.
Stoffer is correct. The stake does not sit in the middle of the driveway. It instead sits in off to the side of the driveway, but still on the Weitzsackers’ property.