Marianne Asher-Chapman is a woman on a mission.

Five years after the disappearance of her daughter, Michelle “Angie” Yarnell, Marianne has been visiting newspapers, going on television, and talking to anyone who would listen about her quest not only for her daughter but for countless other people who have gone missing.

She struck up a friendship with Peggy Florence, who has been searching for her daughter for nearly two years.


Marianne Asher-Chapman is a woman on a mission.
Five years after the disappearance of her daughter, Michelle “Angie” Yarnell, Marianne has been visiting newspapers, going on television, and talking to anyone who would listen about her quest not only for her daughter but for countless other people who have gone missing.
She struck up a friendship with Peggy Florence, who has been searching for her daughter for nearly two years.
Together, the two women founded Missouri Missing, an organization of like-minded individuals who are “united as one voice for all missing Missourians,” according to Asher-Chapman’s business card.
The group has a Web site, www.missourimissing.org and does its best to provide support and helpful information.
“It’s a growing problem,” asserted Asher-Chapman during a visit to The Rolla Daily News.
“This affects a lot of families.
“We’re trying to create awareness. We’d like to see legislation and more interest by law enforcement regarding missing adults. Because these are older people, they (law enforcement) often don’t treat it as a crime.
“In many cases, they just believe it was someone who walked away or ran away.”
“And a lot of the time, we’re dealing with smaller law enforcement agencies, who just don’t have the manpower to investigate these crimes fully.”
Her daughter Angie was 28 at the time of her disappearance Oct. 25, 2003.
“She’s been missing five years and 12 days,” Asher-Chapman said during her visit to the newspaper Nov. 7, stopping by during family members in Rolla.
“I am obsessed with it,” Asher-Chapman admitted. “We need more awareness. People don’t realize how this feels.”
And she would rather they didn’t she said.
“Hopefully, a mother or father will never know this feeling.
“Any time there’s news of an unidentified body, I have to check it out.
“She may be gone but I don’t know where she is.”
She’d like to remain hopeful but ...
“I just want to bury my daughter. Every mother deserves to be able to do that.”
Asher-Chapman has circulated posters and flyers with her daughter’s picture and has also been seeking leads to her daughter’s husband, Mike Yarnell, who is also missing.
The flyer asks that anyone with information on either of the two to call the Morgan County Sheriff’s Department at 573-378-5481 or Marianne at 573-619-8100.
Florence is looking for her daughter who disappeared June 18, 2007 and also has been circulating flyers and posters looking for Jasmine Sue Haslag, last seen in Bland, Mo.
Anyone with information about Haslag is asked to call the Osage County Sheriff’s Department at 573-619-0099 or Florence at 573-999-2084.
Asher-Chapman has succeeded in getting June 17 proclaimed Missing Persons Awareness Day in Missouri.
There was also a fundraiser and tribute for Angie at Versailles City Park Oct. 25.
It’s not enough, said Asher-Chapman.
The Missouri Missing brochure states that the FBI and National Crime Information Center lists nearly 100,000 active missing adult cases in the U.S. as of Jan. 31, 2007. In Missouri, as of June 1 of this year, there were 1,462 active missing person cases.
Based in Jefferson City, the group’s mission statement is to:
• Provide a voice for the missing who can no longer speak for themselves,
• Provide support for the families who have missing loved ones through an outreach program and emergency response team.
• Education and provide public awareness of the impact of missing persons in Missouri.
• Provide information about effective state legislation which directly affects the investigation process in Missouri.
• To work closely with law enforcement and provide as much assistance as possible to individuals and law enforcement agencies in the prevention, investigation and prosecution of all cases involving missing persons in Missouri.
• To distribute photographs and descriptions in all cases involving missing persons in the state.
• To continue to restructure the organization to maximize the efficient use of resources available in all cases of missing persons in the state.
“We’d like to get a coalition of Missouri help groups to focus on this,” said Asher-Chapman.
And, she won’t rest until she can find some closure. In the meantime, she continues to work to help others.
“I’m just working all the time on this. If I can help raise more awareness,” she said as her voice trailed off.